Rotary Foundation funding is released to Districts for financing grants, 3 years after they were contributed.
 
Our 2018-19 TRF giving, comes back as DDF in 2021-22.
 
We are today $130,000 behind in contributions and this means that funding for District and Global grants in 2021-22 will be $75,000 less than for 2020-21.
 
As more clubs access DDF for their humanitarian projects, our nominated DG for 2021-22 Lindsay May is alarmed that there will be many unhappy but well meaning Rotarians who will not be able to fund grants as they did in the previous year.
 
Contributions this year have understandably been impacted by drought appeals, and rightly so. 
 
We all hope that conditions will improve for our farmers but once we reach June 30 2019 we cannot add any funds that provide the valuable match to boost overall grant funding in 2021-22.
 
Personal giving is tax deductible.
Please give now to ensure we can maintain our good works in 3 years time.
 
Lindsay May DGNn 2021-22
 
Note - The above is a general summary of the process and does not fully describe the intricacies of TRF funding."
REGISTER FOR THE CONFERENCE IN 2020
 
20-22 MARCH 2020 at Wollongong Entertainment Centre
 
Register and Pay before 30 June 2019, to receive the Full Conference at the Early Bird Rate of $200
 
 
 
Rotary is giving US$100 million in grants to support the global effort to end polio, a vaccine-preventable disease that once paralyzed hundreds of thousands of children each year.
 
The funding comes as Rotary and its partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) address the final—and most pressing—challenges to ending poliovirus transmission, and as Nigeria approaches three years without any reported cases of wild poliovirus, bringing the Africa region closer to polio-free status.
 
“We have the wild poliovirus cornered in the smallest geographic area in history, and now there are just two countries that continue to report cases of the wild virus,” said Michael K. McGovern, chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee. “As we work with our partners to apply innovative new strategies to reach more children, and embrace lessons learned thus far, Rotary is doubling down on our commitment to end polio for good. I’m optimistic that the end of polio is within our grasp, but we must remain vigilant in rallying global political and financial support as we push towards a polio-free world.”
 
While there were only 33 cases of wild poliovirus reported in 2018, the last mile of eradication has proven to be the most difficult. Barriers to eradication--like weak health systems, insecurity, and mobile and remote populations--must be overcome. As long as a single child has polio, all children are at risk, which underscores the need for continued funding and commitment to eradication.
 
To support polio eradication efforts in endemic countries, Rotary is allocating half the funds it announced today to: Afghanistan ($16.3 million), Nigeria ($10.2 million), and Pakistan ($25.2million). Additional funding will support efforts to keep vulnerable countries polio-free:
 
  • Chad ($102,395)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo ($9.5 million)
  • Ethiopia ($2.6 million)
  • Iraq ($6 million)
  • Kenya ($6.3 million)
  • Mali ($1.2 million)
  • Somalia ($1.4 million)
  • South Sudan ($1.2 million)
  • Syria ($1.7 million)
  • Yemen ($2.1 million)
 
The World Health Organization (WHO) will receive $1.3 million to conduct research, and will also receive support for surveillance activities in its Africa ($10.9 million) and Eastern Mediterranean ($4 million) Regions.
 
Rotary has committed to raising $50 million a year to be matched 2-to-1 by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, amounting to $150 million for polio eradication annually. Rotary has contributed more than $1.9 billion to fight the disease, including matching funds from the Gates Foundation, and countless volunteer hours since launching its polio eradication program, PolioPlus, in 1985. In 1988, Rotary became a spearheading partner in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative with the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Gates Foundation later joined. Since the initiative launched, the incidence of polio has plummeted by more than 99.9 percent, from about 350,000 cases in 1988 to 33 cases of wild poliovirus in 2018.
 
 
 
 
In September the Zone 8 Rotary Conference will be held in Christchurch New Zealand from 20th – 22nd September 2019. Previously known as the Zone Institute this Zone 8 Conference is open to all Rotarians to attend and participate in. You will be able to meet and make new friends, and learn more about the amazing work of Rotary. This will also be an opportunity show your support for the people of Christchurch especially after the earthquake and the recent tragic events that impacted so many people. It will be a time to see how Christchurch has been reinvigorated and what it is continuing to do after the earthquake.
 
The Organising Committee have done an excellent job in getting together a fantastic programme of presenters who you will find inspiring and challenging. The breakout groups on Saturday afternoon will also be very special. The then President of Rotary International Mark Maloney and his wife Gay will be present and Mark will be talking about his vision for the future of Rotary.
 
It promises to be a great weekend. I would urge you to attend, below are the links to register. By attending you are supporting not just Rotary but the people of Christchurch who have had some challenging time over the last few years.
 
 
I along with the Organising Committee look forward to welcoming you to Christchurch in September.
 
Kind regards,
Noel
Noel Trevaskis
 
 
 

The Rotary Leadership Institute is successful because it delivers skills and knowledge that Rotarians can apply straight away in their clubs.  It (1) hones leadership skills, (2) builds Rotary knowledge, (3) gives a perspective about where Rotary has been and where it is now, and (4) shares a vision of what Rotary can be.  This is all done while (5) networking with Rotarians from other clubs and (6) providing opportunities for partnering in service. 

 

The two part course is held on a weekend or separately on Saturdays or Sundays to meet demand. Morning tea and lunch are provided.  Each day starts at 8:00am and finishes around 4.00pm.  The cost is $75 and we encourage Clubs to pay for their members attending.

Courses 50, 51 and 52 are open for registration:

RLI 50 runs over the weekend 2-3 March at the District Office, Thornleigh. 

RLI 51 runs Saturday 4th and 18th of May at the District Office, Thornleigh.

RLI 52 runs over the weekend of 1-2 June at a location to be decided in the Penrith/Lower Mountains area.

Register at rli.rotarydistrict9685.org.au

 

 

 

Having a consistent brand image is important to all organisations, Rotary is no exception. In 2013, a new logo & brand image pack was developed, this was to ensure every club, in every district across the world could have the same high standard of brand recognition.

 

Over the past few months, we have been completing health checks, and it is very noticeable that there a lot of old style graphics being used in various publications, including newsletters & flyers, and hardware items, such as banners. Could all clubs please check all of their clubs portfolio, and make the correct changes. When posting anything on social media, or submitting items to the District newsletter, please make sure they are updated.

 

If you're still in doubt, download Rotary's official Voice and Visual Identity Guidelines: https://brandcenter.rotary.org/Asset/DownloadMaster/118

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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